Monday, October 5, 2015

Leather 3rd Anniversary Travel Journals

It's been almost a year since I posted anything here on my blog, wow @ how time flies! I've been enjoying spending time with family this year, with 4 separate family reunion events in as many months. Lately my social media sharing has mostly been via Instagram & Facebook ~ but many of those pics have been food related as we've been experimenting with vegetarian/organic/healthy eating this year. With the arrival of Fall, I'm feeling crafty once again...

Here's a recent craft project I created on a whim for a couple's anniversary gift. Since the traditional 3rd anniversary gift is leather and they travel a lot, I found some nifty faux leather journals on Amazon and decided to add personalized 'luggage tags' ~ made from an upcycled leather wallet!




Through the years, my husband has accumulated a drawer full of Christmas gift men's wallets. (Being a man, he rarely changes wallets so he's got about 3 lifetimes of wallets saved up!)  Using craft scissors, I cut the sections where photo ID's slide into and printed some catchy personalized tags ~ gluing the 'luggage tags' onto the 1st page in the journal.
(The twig pencils came from TJ Maxx.)

With the leftover leather, I cut a heart shape & glued that to a gift card I made from my stash of DIY wedding invitations.





redshedvintage.com© copyright 2015 
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Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Recycled Salad Bowl Sets

It's been quite some time since I've posted here on my blog ~ seems we've all become spoiled by the instant gratification of social media pictures without words, myself included! I've mostly been posting those instant pics on Facebook ~ hope you'll "like" my page there if you haven't already: https://www.facebook.com/pages/redshedvintagecom/231947456841595 

For those who aren't on Facebook, here's a recent upcycle project which I shared there:
Vintage wooden salad bowl sets make great holiday gift baskets, and there's no shortage of them at yard sales and thrift shops.
Here's a vintage salad bowl set which I recently cleaned, painted, sanded, and stained ~ ready to use as individual holiday gift baskets. I use them to hold gifts of various themes, such as guest soaps & rolled wash cloths, kitchen spices & spoons, or hot cocoa & tea packets with candies, etc. I use cellophane gift basket bags from Dollar Tree & tie with jute twine for fast and easy gifts.


Did you know you can remove grease & grime from vintage wooden wares with baking soda? I mix baking soda
& warm tap water to form a thick paste & rub it over greasy wood surfaces, allowing it to dry. After rubbing the paste off with a dish towel dipped in hot water, I put them in a sunny spot to dry. 


For this particular set, I painted the outsides only ~ using various colors of latex flat interior paint, sanded the edges for an aged look, then rubbed oil-based wood stain with sealer over the entire surface including the natural wood interiors.


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Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Covering Country Clutter with Chalkboards



I love using chalkboard paint to cover 1980's country motifs for a simpler look! Not only does it cut down on the visual clutter, it also creates an ever-changeable message board. The flat black color goes with anything ~ even if the chalkboard is left blank it'll look good.
I picked this little kitchen shelf up at a thrift store. Using a small screwdriver, I lifted the plastic sign out from the center and sanded off most of the engraved country motif. After washing & drying it, I sprayed 2 light coats of Rustoleum Chalkboard Paint onto the surface & set it aside to dry.
I painted the shelf using 1 red coat of Plaid's new DecoArt Chalky Finish Paint  (Romance) which has great adhesion coverage! Since it dries so quickly, I was able to sand/distress the same day, just around the edges to add an aged look. After dusting the sanded edges with a clean paint brush, I rubbed an even coat of oil-based Walnut furniture stain over the surface & allowed a couple of days drying time. Using wood glue, I reattached the plastic chalkboard  in it's spot ~ and now have a cute garden room shelf with drawers to hold my seeds.  



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Friday, May 16, 2014

Sew~So To Star~Spangled Apothecary



After several years of painting/distressing/antiquing vintage finds for others, it's nice to have some time to recycle some junque finds for myself lately! This week I scored this cute little sewing notions apothecary at a local thrift shop.

After removing the notions & motifs adorning the drawers with fine grit sandpaper, I applied a thin even basecoat of Vintage color Americana Décor Chalky Finish paint (available at Home Depot and Michael's).

Then I mixed equal parts Cobalt & Admiral Blue acrylic craft paint (.50 cents per bottle, Walmart) for a second coat, followed by a final dry-brush coat of Admiral to darken the color up a bit.
The next day, I used fine grit sandpaper to distress & age just around the edges, followed by wiping a light even coat of oil-based wood stain (Walnut) over the painted surface with a dry cotton rag, allowing a couple of days drying time.



I'm going to use the updated little cabinet to stash the patriotic & military odds & ends I've picked up through the years. 
Have a great week!
~Donna at Red Shed Vintage 

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Friday, March 21, 2014

Piercingly Simple Punched Tin Panels

* This trash to treasure project of mine was featured in the  Winter 2012 edition of A Primitive Place Magazine! *
~ Piercingly Simple Chandelier ~
Instead of replacing our 1970’s builder grade dining room chandelier in our previous home, I decided to give it an upgrade with a piercingly simple punched tin Paul Revere lantern style makeover.
The outdated Lucite plastic panels were easily removed by bending back the lamp frame prongs. I happened to have some old aluminum kick panels from screen doors handy to replace the plastic covers, but thin sheet panels of various metals are available at most home improvement stores. I also gathered hammers, nails of various sizes, screwdrivers and awls to use as metal punch tools; and used an antique pie safe as a drawing model for my lamp template.
Wearing protective eye goggles & gloves, I used one of the plastic panels as a tracing template & cut the aluminum panels with heavy duty scissors. I taped the paper template to the back of each panel and placed them on a wooden board, using a hammer, screwdriver, and nails to create the tin punch designs. Gently bending the panels back into shape after removing the tape and template, I secured the pierced metal panels with the lamp frame prongs.

Here's a little homemade youtube video that I made, for those who learn from seeing instead of reading! ~ Click here to view video ~

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Thursday, March 13, 2014

Easy Wax Ornaments

* Portions of this trash to treasure project of mine were featured in the Winter 2011 edition of A Primitive Place Magazine! *
When beeswax candles burn down to nubs, don’t throw them away ~ recycle them as simple ornaments. You’ll need a small cooking pot which you don’t plan to cook in anymore (preferably one with a pouring spout) assorted small candy molds, tartlet pans, clay or wooden cookie molds, or jello molds, beeswax (or soy) non-toxic candle nubs & pieces, a paper towel with a few dabs of cooking oil to lightly grease the molds, and old ice tongs or toothpicks, and a tray or cutting board to catch spilled wax.
Sort the candle nubs & pieces according to color, if desired, place in the dry cooking pot and melt over very low heat ~ or better yet, melt in an electric tart warmer. Just leave the wicks right in them, they can be removed later with the tongs or a toothpick. If desired, you can add some liquid candle dye (available in candle making section at craft stores, or on etsy.com) to make black or other color ornaments.

When wax becomes liquid, carefully pour into the molds and let them cool until wax hardens. Turn molds upside down and slap gently to remove, insert an ornament hook through the center top, and hang on tree or gifts. If scented candles are used, they also act as air fresheners ~ you can also rub your finished ornaments in a ziplock full of your favorite spices to add scent.
Save the wax melting pot as a container for future nubs, the tartlet pans also make great pantry cakes.

You can also experiment using various scented wax squares which are made to melt in a tart burner (Walmart has some great scented squares for just $2.00-$3.00 per pack) and silicone baking pans or ice cube trays with assorted whimsical shapes.
Never leave warm wax unattended or in the reach of children, as directed on candle & wax package safety warnings, and be sure to protect your hands with potholders!


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Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Portable Pot of Cooking Herbs



I love snipping fresh herbs from the garden for cooking, but now that we've made the move to town home living ~ I needed to plant a patio version of my herb garden this Spring. What better vessel than an old cooking pot!
I placed a layer of garden rocks in the bottom of the pot for drainage, then added potting soil. I carefully removed the plants from their plastic nursery pots by turning them upside down, then placed each plant in around the big soup pot.

Our local Ace Hardware carries small herb plants, the perfect size for creating a sampler of 6 plants. Some grocery stores also carry herb plants in their produce section, or you can find some at home improvement stores which carry garden plants.
I added some soil around the plants, just enough to cover evenly, then sprinkled some water over the pot of plants & placed in a partly sunny section of our patio. Since I'm always misplacing scissors, I tied a pair onto the handle with some twine ~ for snipping clippings!
As a final touch, I gathered some old mismatched spoons & dipped the ends in craft-store chalkboard paint ~ to use as changeable plant markers. Chalk ink markers come in different colors & provide longer lasting writing, but plain ol' chalk works too. I found my chalk markers at Michael's Arts & Crafts, and also have a few which came with chalkboard coffee mugs from Starbucks.  redshedvintage.com© copyright 2014


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Monday, February 3, 2014

Faux Pewter Chocolate Molds

This makeover of mine was featured in the Spring 2012 issue of A Primitive Place Magazine!

Sometimes the package is better than the gift, as was the case with these discarded clear plastic treat containers shaped like chocolate bunnies. These looked so much like antique chocolate molds, I decided to hang on to them and go with the faux. Faux Pewter, that is.
Using inexpensive flat black spray paint, I covered the exterior of these clear plastic candy holders. When dry, I added two coats of Dark Patina by DecoArt Dazzling Metallics (available at Michael’s Arts and Crafts) and allowed drying time. To add a darker patina look, I brushed on some Old English Scratch Cover, wiped the excess with a rag, and sealed with a liberal coat of clear acrylic gloss sealer spray. This same process also works great on discarded plastic egg containers, resulting in a new and improved way to recycle plastics and make holiday decorations on the cheap.
redshedvintage.com© copyright 2014
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Thursday, January 30, 2014

Trash Talk Thursday: Media Apothecary

This makeover of mine was featured in the Winter 2012 issue of A Primitive Place Magazine!


This unfinished Pine media storage chest was a $5.00 Goodwill find, with handy removable drawers for storing various media discs.
I like to think of unpainted wood as the primitive décor lover’s canvas; it’s ready to be stained or painted to fit in with your own personal style. I chose a two-toned finish, with red drawers in a black chest.
Using interior flat wall paint, I applied two coats of flat black to the chest and drawer fronts. When dry, I added one coat of flat Candy Apple to the drawer fronts. I used my electric palm sander with fine grit sandpaper to gently distress just the edges & knobs, then rubbed water based wood stain over the entire surface with a cotton rag.
Media storage racks are also great for stashing craft supplies, garden seeds, photographs, fragile ornaments, or small toys in kid’s rooms. redshedvintage.com© copyright 2014






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Monday, January 20, 2014

Putting Up A Faux Front

Apothecary cabinets provide lots of little drawers for stashing stuff, but here's another way to utilize the space behind a 'cabinet' ~ go faux! Woodcrafters and unfinished wooden furniture stores often carry faux-front appliance covers of various sizes ~ made to look like an apothecary cabinet in the front but open from the back ~ for placing over toaster ovens or other small countertop appliances.
I picked a used one up @ a thrift shop, and decided to give it a more primitive finish.

First, I removed the fake button drawer pulls. Then I sprayed a light base-coat primer of generic flat Black spray paint across the front & sides. Next, I applied a coat of flat latex To Die For Red (Better Homes & Gardens wall paint, Walmart) and allowed proper drying time before lightly sanding the edges with extra fine sandpaper, for a distressed aged look. Last, I rubbed an even coat of Walnut wood stain across the surface with a clean cotton rag. 
After 24 hours drying time, I  drilled larger knob holes to insert the more realistic looking peg pulls (from the unpainted wood crafts section @ Hobby Lobby) adding a dab of wood glue in each hole before twisting the knobs in.
Faux-front cabinets are also great for hiding bathroom supplies, counter clutter, cookbooks, and of course ~ handy kitchen appliances & gadgets you'd rather not leave hanging out. redshedvintage.com© copyright 2014
 
 

 

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Thursday, November 7, 2013

Trash Talk Thursday: Repurposed Pu-Pu Platter Pineapples

Festive 1960's Luau parties called for festive Hawaiian serving platters, so nearly every home ended up with at least 1 wooden monkey pod pineapple. Often sold as pu-pu platter serving sets, pineapple shaped serving pieces included bowls, trays, mugs, tidbit servers, condiment cups.
Since the Pineapple has long been the symbol of hospitality, why not repurpose some vintage pineapple shaped wares during the holidays?
After adding a coat of green acrylic paint to the bottoms of some pineapple bowls, I added a coat of crackle medium to just the body part of the bowl. (I've heard that plain white school glue has the same effect, but I haven't tried that myself.) When dry, I covered the crackle medium with mustard yellow acrylic craft paint, resulting in a more primitive pineapple-like finish with the green peeking through. Brown would also be a great base coat, if you'd rather. When the paint was completely dry, I used a cotton rag to rub a coat of oil-based walnut wood stain over the entire surface. Happy with the upgrade, I ventured on to try the same colors on some pineapple shaped mugs & tidbit trees.
I added some pineapple scented wax shapes in some to give as hostess gifts (made from store-bought wax melts and pineapple chocolate molds ~ rubbed in ground ginger) and tied some of the smaller bowls onto holiday wreaths. These also can be used for organizing or displaying so much more than just serving up pu-pu party finger foods!  © copyright 2013 redshedvintage.com


 
 
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Thursday, October 31, 2013

Trash Talk Thursday: An Apple By Any Other Name = A Pumpkin

 
Serving up salads with flair created a need for artful vessels back in the 1960's ~ 80's. Salad bowl sets in a variety of shapes and themes became a staple in kitchen serving ware, including  wooden bowls in the shape of different fruits to coincide with salad ingredients and/or pu-pu platter spreads. Apples, pears, pineapples, even acorns were popular salad serving themes.
I added even more flair to these thrift-store apple shaped wooden bowls, by painting/sanding/staining them different shades of orange ~ perfect for Autumn décor !  I used the largest bowl for trick~or~treat candies, the smaller bowls for Fall potpourri mix, pumpkin flavored coffee creamers, guest soaps in the bathroom, and displaying pumpkin scented wax shapes. Next week I'll share how I updated some pineapple shaped pu-pu platter bowls! © copyright 2013 redshedvintage.com
~ Have a safe & happy Halloween ~ 
 
  
 

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